GLOBAL ACCESS NEWS TRAVEL E-ZINE
VOLUME I, NUMBER 1, April 2000
Copyright © 2000, Global Access News

http://www.globalaccessnews.com
clearpath@cox.net


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Please note: Any Internet links mentioned in this E-Zine were verified as functioning as of the date on this E-Zine. Websites and e-mail addresses, however, change frequently, so changes may have occurred after that date.

Welcome to the premier issue of the Global Access News Travel E-Zine.  In this issue, we share travel tips and accessible information provided by our many resourceful readers and supporters throughout the world. Thanks to each and every one of you for taking the time to write us and help other travelers.  

CONTENTS

1. BOSTON'S ACCESSIBLE PARKS
2. CRUISE TO NOWHERE
3. HEALTH BENEFITS WHEN YOU TRAVEL
4. ACCESSIBLE VIEWING OF LONDON'S CHANGING OF THE GUARD
5. BARCELONA BUSES
6. OCEAN CITY, MD ACCESSIBLE ACCOMMODATIONS
7. DISCOVERING ACCESSIBLE WALES
8. ACCESSIBLE DEATH VALLEY, CALIFORNIA
9. LOWER SAXONY ACCESS
10. BANFF ACCESS
11. ACCESS ROME & MILAN

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1. BOSTON'S ACCESSIBLE PARKS

Boston
resident Mike S. explored the following Boston parks and trails that provide good access for wheelchair users.

Arnold Arboretum provides 250 acres, with several miles of paved pedestrian roadways, and 5000 varieties of labeled trees. Two of the three hilltops have paved pedestrian access; all three have excellent views. The Orange line Forest Hills stop is a tenth of a mile from the nearest park entrance.

Stony Brook Reservation offers 500 wooded acres, with rarely used paved bike paths running through large parts of it. The paths are slowly falling into disrepair. Bus access only.
Blue Hills holds 7000 wooded acres, including some access. There is a paved pedestrian roadway to the top of Great Blue Hill (635 ft.). For a flat hike, there is an abandoned one-mile stretch of the old Rte 128. Also, Houghton's Pond has a one-mile dirt path around it. Bus access only.

Breakheart Reservation
provides 600 wooded acres. This is a wonderfully scenic park with more than two miles of sometimes hilly (but paved) pedestrian roadway. The two large ponds are wheelchair accessible at several spots. However, this area has no decent bus access.
Charles River Reservation is located 15 or so miles along the Charles River. The paths vary wildly in pleasantness and accessibility. Ask before you use! The Red line Charles/MGH and Kendall/MIT stops are downtown near the Charles River. There is bus access in a few other places.

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2. CRUISE TO NOWHERE

Not every cruise ship provides the access promised in flashy brochures. Know before you go. Check out the March issue of New Mobility Magazine for Robert Samuels' revealing article "A Princess of a Cruise: But a Little Off the Mark." If you're not already a subscriber, order your issue at the site. http://www.newmobility.com/magazine/

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3. HEALTH BENEFITS WHEN YOU TRAVEL


Thomas P. McCormack, of Washington, D.C., explores what happens to health benefits when a disabled person travels in "Travel & Vacations with a Major Illness or Disability: Are You Covered?" © 2000. To learn more, visit
http://www.globalaccessnews.com/healthand%20travel2000.htm

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4. ACCESSIBLE VIEWING OF LONDON'S CHANGING OF THE GUARD


Daphne J. of Melbourne, Australia, describes the easy, accessible way to view London's famous Changing of the Guard without having your view blocked by animated camera-laden tourists. According to Daphne, disabled visitors and companions are allowed behind the Buckingham Palace gate in the forecourt to view the morning spectacle. Simply write ahead to the Lord Chamberlain's Office at Buckingham Palace and state your disability, the dates you'll be in London, the number in your group and the phone, fax and address of where you plan to stay. Be sure to follow up with a phone call to the Palace after you arrive in London. They'll fax you a permission letter to present at the gate and you're all set. 

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5. BARCELONA BUSES


Blake M., of Chicago, IL, was delighted to find he could easily travel in his manual wheelchair throughout Barcelona, Spain on public buses. According to Blake, all Barcelona buses provide the same easy access he enjoyed in New York City last year.

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6. OCEAN CITY, MD ACCESSIBLE ACCOMMODATIONS

If Ocean City, Maryland is on your travel itinerary, Linda J., of Bethesda, MD, recommends visiting their web site first to choose accessible accommodations. http://ococean.com/disable.html

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7. DISCOVERING ACCESSIBLE WALES


If you're planning a trip to the "Land of Song," Amanda S., of Philadelphia, PA, advises disabled travelers to visit the Wales Tourist Board site. Click "Contact Us" and write for their free very informative guide "Discovering Accessible Wales." It's chock full of helpful information to plan your trip. http://www.tourism.wales.gov.uk/index2.html

 
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8. ACCESSIBLE DEATH VALLEY, CALIFORNIA


Yes, you read that correctly--Death Valley, which often tops 120 degrees on some summer days. Janie P, of San Francisco, CA, sent us this URL, which provides some very useful information on the trails and accessible bathrooms in this hot spot. Unfortunately, the included motel and campground listings lack vital access details. http://www.ivnet.net/usr/pupfish/whlchair.ht

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9. LOWER SAXONY ACCESS


Winfried H., of Göttingen, Germany, who recently contributed his Irish web sites on Galway and the Giants’ Causeway: http://www.globalaccessnews/disabilitylinks.html shared the following link to Lower Saxony in Germany. The capital of Lower Saxony is Hanover--the site of this year's World Exhibition (expo). The expo will be entirely accessible for people with disabilities. Choose the "Version in large writing" for the English translation.  http://www.barrierefrei-reisen.de/

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10. BANFF NATIONAL PARK


Natures lovers like Tim J. (who provided this URL) will be thrilled to discover that Canada's Banff National Park provides ample access for disabled visitors including campsites, bathrooms, showers, ramps, etc. Banff's Visitor Centre provides a "Free Wheelin'" Access Guide. Learn more about Banff at: http://www.worldweb.com/ParksCanada-Banff/servdi_e.html

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11. ACCESS ROME & MILAN

TOURISM FOR ALL, C.O.IN,
which plans to eventually include access information on many Italian cities, is off to a great start with on-line access guides now available for Rome, which cover hotels, restaurants, churches, museums, transportation, etc., and Milan, which details accessible hotels. http://andi.casaccia.enea.it/Andi/COIN/TUR/inglese/turismo.htm

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Global Access News welcomes your travel reports, tips, and comments. Thanks for sharing!
clearpath@cox.net

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